Q. I just heard that the mother of an old friend died several months ago. I haven’t seen or talked to the friend in over a year due to her move to another state and my own busy life. Her mom was very kind to me when I was a teenager and needed all the positive reinforcement I could get. I’d like to send a condolence note, but so much time has passed and I feel embarrassed about losing touch. Should I write or not? What can I say?

 

It’s never too late to express sympathy, especially if the deceased made an impact on your life and/or the bereaved really means something to you. The problem is it’s hard enough to write a condolence message under the best of circumstances. Embarrassment just adds an extra excuse to forget the whole thing.

 

Although it’s true that you’ve been out of touch, it’s also true that she hasn’t contacted you either. She’s probably just as skittish as you are. And people do appreciate receiving condolence notes, regardless of when they arrive. It’s comforting to know that someone made the effort.

 

To find the right words, try to relax and think about your friend and her mother. Let your mind wander and see what pops out. You’re apt to recall memories that make you smile. It’s the little things that often mean a lot. Positive recollections will also resonate for your friend, bringing her mother alive. 

 

For example, your own wording above could be a powerful way to start: “Dear ---, What can I say? I happened to meet your uncle, who told me that your mom died last March. I was shocked. She always seemed indestructible. I was just remembering when she drafted us to help plant her vegetable garden. I’ve got a green thumb today, thanks to her. She taught me how to bake brownies, too. I won’t forget her. I send my deepest condolences.”         

 

It’s up to you whether you mention resuming contact. Sometimes we just want to say goodbye to the deceased, nothing more. But if you do want to reconnect, you can add, “This news makes me realize how much time has passed since we last talked. Please let me know what’s going on in your life. My e-mail address is----.” Or tell her that you’ll call soon, if you want to do that.     

 

If you have a question for Florence, please email her at fisaacs@florenceisaacs.com.

 

Florence Isaacs is the author of several books on etiquette, including My Deepest Sympathies: Meaningful Sentiments for Condolence Notes a.... She writes two advice blogs for Legacy.com: Sincere Condolences and Widow in the World, a new blog for bereaved spouses and partners.

 

Image via Flickr Creative Commons / Beverly & Pack

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Tags: condolence notes, how to help a grieving friend, loss of a parent, mothers and grandmothers, reaching out after a loss, staying in touch in times of loss, sympathy and support, what to say when someone dies

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Comment by Lee H. Hilton III on October 9, 2011 at 2:02pm

Your Screven County High School class of 1954 grieves your loss Miriam...remembering the quiet young girl that traveled on the Silver Metior to New York City on our senior trip...

Remembering your younger sister and your kind,gentle ways in a world that was just opening up to the young people who lived and studied in Sylvania, Georgia a long time ago...

Rest in piece Miriam as your beloved family of siblings,Tom and the many people that you touched their lives will be forever grateful to you and we WILL once again meet as we cross over into the next demension of life eternal...

RIP

Comment by Dominique Marie Ross on October 7, 2011 at 5:19am

I like to apologize to my comadre's and close friends to my family for not being able to join in their services today.  Me, my family, and my dad give Sonja, Vanessa, and Sheila our condolences.  I am so sorry about Donovan, and I feel very bad about not coming today.  I love you, and God bless all of ur family...

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